Social Second-Screening Peaks with The World Cup

Today we continue our World Cup theme and consider the opportunities for marketers to engage their audience beyond the TV screen – namely, on the second-screen.

The World Cup is set to attract great numbers of viewers to their TV sets but it’s not the only screen that will demand attention.

Virtually every World Cup Fan (93%) will be using another device as they watch the games unfold and mobiles (77%) are the obvious device of choice.

It’s not all about the ads on the main screen, then; marketers will need a strategy that extends into the digital space and reaches audiences across multiple screens.

Social media is where most will be heading on their second-screens.

Out of the 10 activities we track, World Cup Fans are most likely to be using social media (51%) and messaging friends (48%).

Most will go to social to see content related to what’s on their main screens – whether that’s sharing reactions to a match on Twitter, or watching replays of a goal on Facebook.

Live matches are not necessarily a time to start pushing promotional content across digital channels, though. Searching for products to buy comes further down the list, behind reading emails, news and playing games.

It’s about becoming part of the conversation and capitalizing on moment marketing.

Bud Light has been particularly savvy with this and launched its Fantasy Football Championship and uses Twitter as a second screen experience that keeps fans engaged with its brand during the games.

Above all, the key is to create content that viewers will want to view, without getting in the way of them accessing the commentary and updates from their friends that they want to view.

World Cup Fans are defined as internet users aged 16-64 who watch the FIFA World Cup online or on TV.